Sewing

Some Favourite Refashion Bloggers.

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In celebration of having over 800 followers and 1200 visits to my blog, I decided to do a post honouring some of the bloggers who I have been following for a while.  These people have unique voices and cool ideas of how to upcycle their finds and live a life of not just making do with second-hand pieces, but embracing the joy of the wonderful finds to be found and making them their own.  Enjoy!

Confessions of a Refashionista  A quirky and amazing Canadian gal who lives in Berlin and has great talent for refashioning her finds.  And she is just really bubbly and funny to boot.  I love her refashions.  Check her out at http://awesomesauceasshattery.com

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Merricks Art  This gal has amazing dress making style.  She is more of a start from scratch kind of gal with real talent but she does some amazing refashions as well.  She has amazing style and wears beautiful classic clothes that often have a delightful twist.  Check her out at http://www.merricksart.com/                                             image

Makery   This lady has amazing talents in turning the unloved and unwanted finds into some beautiful, classic yet quirky pieces.  I love her blog.  Check her out at http://www.makery.ukimage

Charity Shop Chic  This lady has the most amazing talents, she can sew like a dream, design patterns from scratch and refashion better than almost anyone I have followed.  Check her out at http://charityshopchic.net/

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Trash to Couture  Another great refashioner who makes beautiful things for herself and her family.  She refashions thrifted items and also dyes them in unique ways to give them new life.  Check her out at http://www.trashtocouture.com

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The Renegade Seamstress She is an amazing seamstress, taking thrifted items and completely upcycling them into beautifully tailored pieces.  She has been featured in a number of sewing publications as well.  Check her out at https://chicenvelopements.wordpress.com/

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These ladies are just a few of the fantastic refashioners, sewers and thrifters that I follow.  They inspire me to think outside the box when thrifting and refashioning to see the beauty in a piece for it’s fabric, colour, pattern or cut.  We all need a little inspiration in our lives and these ladies are just some of mine.  Cheers, Michele

 

Refashion Co-op Associate!!! That’s Me!!

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imageImage from Refashion Co-op

Two weeks ago I sent a request to be a contributor to a community refashioning blog called Refashion Co-op.  I never expected to hear anything and then, low and behold, this past Saturday I got a super fantastic invite to join the community as a blogging associate.  I was so thrilled that I cried and did a little dance in my living room.  Total geek, I know.  But anyways, I immediately wrote up a blog post about my silk scarf into a top refashion and sent it in and within hours, it was up on their website.

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Again…totally thrilled…more tears, more dancing.  I have since posted my Snowy sweater refashion.

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So I would recommend checking Refashion Co-op out, there are some fantastic people showcasing their amazing talents and refashioning skills.   Cheers, Michele

Milou or Snowy to the Rescue!! Sweater Refash!!

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This refashion is inspired by my favourite thrifted sweater.  I was lucky enough to find this hand knit sweater that someone had stitched my favourite Belgian journalist/detective/adventurer across the front…Tintin!

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Here is a picture of the inspiration sweater, in case you hadn’t seen it before.  I figured that Tintin needed his best friend Snowy.  Or Milou if you read the french versions of the books.

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This new sweater began life as a boring V-neck sweater that I thrifted from Value Village for $4.99. I had been on the lookout for weeks to find the right one, I only wish that the knit was bigger so that I could use bigger stitches for the pattern. But this was the one I found.

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I first found the centre of the sweater and marked it with chalk. Then using the chalk, I sketched my Milou or Snowy.  Unfortunately I didn’t realize until after I started stitching that the that the picture I took with the sketched Snowy did not show the sketch clearly.

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I used this image from Google for the pattern.

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The yarn I used was also thrifted for $2.99 from Value Village. I just followed the stitch marks on the sweater and made looped stitches to create the pattern.

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And here is the final result. It took me about 10-12 hours to do the stitching, I know the results are not perfect, and Snow looks a little chunky, but I am very pleased with how it turned out anyways.  This refashion only cost me $8 and a relaxing bit of time watching Veronica Mars DVDs.  What do you think.  Love to hear your opinion.  Cheers, Michele

Thrifty Outfit of the Day! #2

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This skirt is thrifted and refashioned in a previous post.  I love how it fits now.  The Cowl neck sweater and cream top are thrifted as well.  The boots are ones I have had for years and I bought them at a huge discount in Maastricht in the Netherlands.  I love them so much I have taken them to a cobbler and had them repaired to be reborn and reloved again.  The necklace is part of my collection and I need to wear it more.

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Top: $7.99 Value Village

Skirt: $12.99. Value Village (refashioned by me)

Necklace: vintage thrifted and restrung by me

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Sweater: $9.99. Value Village

What do you think?

Skirt with issues! #2

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This is another skirt refashion.  I know, I know, not another one.  But I really liked this skirt from the first moment I saw it, but it had issues.

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First the waistband was too tight, and second it had pleats in the front which made me look like I was about 5 months pregnant.image

So the waist band and the pleats had to go.

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First I carefully removed the waistband.  Luckily the zipper ended below the waist band so this refashion didn’t require any fiddling with the zipper because I hate trying to fix zippers.  Then I removed the pleats from both the skirt and the lining and zigzagged the two raw edges together and trimmed off all the loose threads.  I just turned the waistband and stitched it down.

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The skirt fits perfectly now and baby belly has gone away.   I love the colours and pattern of this pencil skirt, it is pure wool, fully lined, has pockets and best of all, it has pockets!

Once too big, now just right. Or a skirt refashion.

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This caramel coloured corduroy skirt had become too large and ill-fitting since I had slimmed down in the hip and waist area.  I thrifted this skirt a while ago and it is an excellent skirt for wearing with boots and a big chunky sweater, but alas all my squats have made it too big and baggy while making me less so.

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So I took a newly thrifted denim skirt that fits me very well and lay it on top of the corduroy skirt to get an idea of how much to take it in.

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Then I used a seam ripper to open up the side seams.  As you can see, the front pockets go all the way to the side seam so I couldn’t take the skirt in equally from the front and back or I would lose some pocket space.  And goodness knows I love clothes with pockets, so that just could not happen.

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So I pulled the back panel forward and stitched along the old front panel seam allowance to give me the proper amount of taking in. In the photo, you can see the wider strip of seam allowance from the back panel and the original seam allowance from the front now happily stitched together.  Then I trimmed off the extra fabric after trying it on to make sure it fit, and heck yes, it was just right.  Then I zigzagged the raw edge.

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I restitched the hem at the side seams, before “stitching in the ditch” of the side seem to hold down the waist lining.  You can see the tiny stitches and cut threads that show the little tagging of the waistband lining to the skirt, but since I “stitched in the ditch” the stitches are invisible on the outside.

I know this is a very simple refashion, but these are often the kinds I am forced to do to make my thrifted clothes fit like they were made for me, not their former owners.  Not all my refashions are huge and dramatic, but having clothing fit right makes a world of difference in how they look, both in cut and use value.

Cheers, Michele